Toronto Practice on Dec. 14, 2014

by Kelvin Ho on 2014/12/15

1) Foundations and 5 Yilus
2) 2-Person Drill: Find the dot on the opponent, add one to break the dot
3) 2-Person Drill: Step in to get closer to the opponent without him knowing (no change in pressure on the contact point)
4) 1-Person Drill: Similar to 3), but use the column or corner wall as the opponent. Push with one hand against the column, step to the side of the column without changing the pressure on the hand.

Video on Adding One:

The dot referred here is a point on the opponent’s body where he doesn’t want to move. You can test it out by applying pressure on the opponent’s body (using ji or by stretching him out). Once you find out where it is, there are at least two ways to use it. To be able to use it, you need to maintain it, and don’t let it change. Maintaining a dot on the opponent is like a fighter jet locking onto a target. You then either break the dot (or maybe I should say break the line at the dot) or rotate on the dot. Breaking the dot is like hitting it, but it must be done using something that is not involved in maintaining the dot. If you use your hands to lock the opponent, you can use your waist/shoulder/elbow/head to break the dot, but not your hands. The difference with rotating on the dot is a directional difference with the “hitting” force, one is head on at the dot, the other is to the side of the dot using the dot as the centre of rotation. I think that there are at least 3 types of dots: one on the opponent’s body, one between the opponent and myself, and one on my body. It depends on which one you choose to use.

 

About Kelvin Ho

Kelvin Ho, Master Chen Zhonghua's disciple, is the instructor for Practical Method Toronto. He has been teaching and promoting the Practical Method system in Toronto, Markham, Richmond Hill, Canada since 2011. He has received numerous medals in various Taiji competitions in Greater Toronto Area. He is also a vice-president of MartialArts Association Canada. Like his teacher, he feels an obligation to pass this great art onto others. Contact: kelvin.ho@practicalmethod.ca.

{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

Ken December 21, 2014 at 6:13 pm

Not bad!

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