Knowledge : General theory can set the path!

This is the second of theories that are general in nature, which means they apply to more than the Chen Style Taijiquan Practical Method.

“太极拳,缠法也。”陈鑫这一句话把太极拳的缠绕的重要性普遍性说到位了。陈、
杨、吴、武、孙各家的螺旋缠绕含露有别,而以陈式太极拳表现得最为明显。陈式太极拳
实用拳法对于缠法有独到的研究和见解。 Read more

Author: Chen Zhonghua     Length: 60 minutes     Language: English     Chapters: 1     Year: 2010     Location: Edmonton
In 60 minutes, Master Chen Zhonghua clearly demonstrated the hand-foot relationships in every move of the entire Chen Style Taijiquan Practical Method Yilu routine. Demonstrating the principles of stick energy to push, and rope energy to pull.

Hand-Foot Connection Online Video
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Why does a robotic arm have so much power that it can kill you? Because it’s attached to something that doesn’t move.

One: Solemn i

by Hong Junsheng on 2010/10/26

Though Taijiquan belongs to the realm of traditional sport, it is a perfect art form with precise theory and complex methodology. It is also a suitable method for people’s health. Students of this art should follow the rules strictly and go for the difficulties. They should carefully seek the regularities. In doing so, the first requirement is “solemn.” Read more

Energy Alignment One Online Video
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The human energy flows in the body in an organized way which we cannot see with the naked eye or feel by ourselves. The way the energy flows is defined in Taiji as Energy Alignment. This is  a video series based on instructions of Chen Style Taijiquan Practical Method Yilu Routine. There are four DVDs in this series. In terms of depth of knowledge, the instructions of this video series belongs to level three (one is basic choreographic learning, two is details of instruction). Please see Energy Alignment 2, 3, 4 for trailers  Author: Chen Zhonghua. Length: 1:00 hour long          Language: English          Postures: 1-28 (sections 1 and 2)


Energy Alignment is a video series based on instructions of Chen Style Taijiquan Practical Method Yilu Routine. There are four DVDs in this series. In terms of depth of knowledge, the instructions of this video series belongs to level three (one is basic choreographic learning, two is details of instruction).

Author作者:Chen Zhonghua 陈中华     Length: 1:09 hours 小时     Language: English 英文     Postures: 29-49 (sections 3 and half of 4)动作

Energy Alignment Two Online Video
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Energy Alignment is a video series based on instructions of Chen Style Taijiquan Practical Method Yilu Routine. There are four DVDs in this series. In terms of depth of knowledge, the instructions of this video series belongs to level three (one is basic choreographic learning, two is details of instruction).  By: Chen Zhonghua 陈中华      Language: English 英文     Length: 43:41 Minutes分钟     Postures: 50-68 (finish section 6) 动作

Energy Alignment Three Online Video
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These are some photos and a video of a practice session at the Ottawa October 2010 workshop. Care to guess what they are trying to practice? Read more

Shifu,

As a result of studying some videos and increasing my practice time, I came across some new discoveries that need some confirmation. Read more

There are many important principles in Chen Style Taiji Practical Method. One of which is the principle of 45 Degree. I have heard Chen Zhonghua spoke of it many times since. After years of studying and discovering, I am realizing its importance. Read more

At the full time class in Edmonton this afternoon, I taught the concept of in and out. The general principle is: “The inside must stay inside; the outside must stay outside”.  Translating this into taiji movement terms, it is “In with elbow; out with hand”.

Lead With The Finger i

by Khamserk on 2010/09/23

Power is always from the back but the difference is the direction. Read more

You might wonder why I bring the 1930’s into the equation. Well, to my mind, the 1930’s is where all the trouble started for a lot of students.  So what happened in the 1930’s you may ask.

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Zhu Dongsheng, Hu and Chu of Lin Yi came to visit last night. They left this morning to Rizhao. I taught about the taiji movement of “moving without movement” using two tea cups. Zhu took the cups as a souvenir.

Posted via email from Zhonghua’s posterous

Wu Shaozhi of Linyi and Chen Xu of Zibo came to visit. They stayed for two days. Watched Wu’s form, made corrections and comments. He made progress again. Chen Xu came to Daqingshan through the Zibo Taijiquan Competition held in Yiyuan that the Daqingshan team attended. His push hands was quite good. He noticed that the feeling of push hands is not what he expected from observing my students at the competition.

Posted via email from Zhonghua’s posterous

The front must be full and the back must be stable. You can push from the back but not the front.

Intention 1

by Khamserk on 2010/08/24

Master Chen talked a little about intention.  Read more

I was having a conversation over dinner with my Taiji brother Nicholas Fung about the frustrations of learning Taiji.  He was wondering aloud about the method for learning.  Read more

Notes:

-Talking about stretching to attain proper structure: Chemicals/toxins deposit in your ‘corners’. Eliminate all corners/creases and create the arch. No power. Structure! Read more

Taiji and Time 4

by Khamserk on 2010/07/26

The relation between Taiji and the Taoist concept of time is a topic which Master Chen has emphasized as extremely important, Read more

At lunch Master Chen compared learning Taiji to boiling water: The requirement for boiling water is 100 degrees, even if the water is 99 degrees it is still not boiling.  From one perspective the water might as well still be cold because it is still not boiling; 99 degrees might as well be 1 degree.  In reality 99 degrees is only 1 degree away from boiling while 1 degree is still 99 degrees away from boiling. Read more

Master Chen said there are many things he can’t do which would give the impression that he is not very flexible.  But, he insists, his joints are round and smooth which means he can maneuver them freely.  Maneuverability is favored over looseness.  If you are not stiff, you have no power.  If your joints are not round you have no maneuverability.

When we learn the form we must copy what we see.  This is not wrong.  Form means to get from here to there.  What’s wrong is how we get there, the way we do it.  The form must look the same but the action must be exactly the opposite of what you would come up with on your own.

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The size of movement of each part of the body must match. For example the hand is capable of a much wider range of motion than the body, therefore the hand can only be allowed to move as much as the body does.

Today Master Chen reinforced a point of Push Hands with me.  All the lessons that have been mentioned in class lately and our last weekend Seminar is to look for a line and Read more

Here is something that I shared with a friend today.

  1. Learn principles, not techniques. Read more

Today Master Chen started with Foundation exercises led by Allan Belsheim and then the group worked on Yilu repetitions with several important corrections. Read more

YouTube – Size of Circles. By Chen Zhonghua. Filmed in Holland in 2008. This is a clip from hunyuantaiji on youtube.

YouTube – Chen and Calandra Taiji Applications. Master Chen Zhonghua and Michael Calandra explained some of the Cannon Fist techniques in this video clip. The setting was in Master Calandra’s dojo in Queen, NY in 2003 at a workshop on Cannon Fist of Chen Style Taijiquan Practical Method.

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By: Chen Zhonghua陈中华.      Length: 3:08 minutes分钟.      Year: 2010年.     Language: English英文.
This is a video clip from Master Chen Zhonghua’s May 2010 Montreal workshop. It gives instructions on the application sequence of 1 (make contact), 2 (get in and not disturb the opponent) and 3 (settle the body and move the contacting point out).

Details of 1, 2, and 3 Online Video
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Here are some thoughts from an evening class with Master Chen and Allan in January.

-In the circles the first move is outside, the second move is inside. Read more

Body Functions Online Video
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In Chen Style Taijiquan Practical Method, body functions are very important. This means that each part of the body has its own functions. It is not a case of the whole body working as ONE. That phrase might have been used but the meaning is not literal. Read more

On Fang Song (Relax) i

by admin on 2010/03/18

Saw this quote from a very famous taiji master in China. The master is no longer living today:
rotate
I say to my students, the first day I tell you to relax; a month later I tell you to relax; a year later I tell you to relax; ten years later I tell you to relax; and a dozen years later I still tell you to relax. Read more

Don’t toss! i

by admin on 2010/03/11

Thanks to those who posted the quoted videos on youtube.

Tossing, or body swaying, is one of the ills of taijiquan practice. Tossing is something that people naturally do. It is not a trained characteristic of taijiquan. It has the “benefit” of looking good when done in taiji routine practices.

Today, most people take pride in “tossing”. Read more

“Withdraw is to issue” is an important concept in Chen Style Taijiquan Practical Method. It is also a measurement of level of skill in this style. Here Master Chen explains a technical aspect of this skill. Read more

This seminar was attended by three visitors/new students. Nicholas Fung, an old student of mine, is visiting from Hong Kong. Wilkin Ng is from Vancouver and he has joined us. Gino Nasato is from Victoria. He has been an active participant in my Victoria workshops and in local classes there. He is visiting this weekend also.

The main subject this weekend is on how to keep three different lines while pushing hands. This is a very difficult act to perform. I explained and experimented for students the example of how to aim at something or some place. In our push hands or applications, we often don’t push towards where we ACTUALLY intend to push!. This is a question of the mind intent not harmonized with the energy alignment. This question touches upon our basic natural disposition. It is very important for you NOT to believe that you don’t have this problem!

I have been giving this group of people seminars here for the seventh year. We started in Vancouver and moved to Fort Langley and finally settled in Maple Ridge. Currently we have three students from Seattle, one from Denver, CO who joins us occasionally, several from Victoria, and one from Nanaimo. Some have to drive more than three hours to get here; others have to take the ferry for over 5 hours. I fly here from Edmonton early in the morning. All this for Chen Style Taijiquan Practical Method!

At Master Sun Zhonghua’s apartment in Beijing, I summarized my teachings during the recent June 9, 2008 trip to China and the topic of restriction was on the top.
One of the ways of looking at our movements in Taijiquan is to divide movements into two types:
  1. Movements that causes the body to create an outer going force so that the body is made to move outwards.
  2. Movements that causes the body not to move so that the body can stay in a certain position.

These two types of movements form the proper physical structure for our taiji practice.

Wuwei i

by webmaster2 on 2008/03/03

Wuwei

Wuwei is “none doing”. It is a concept that sometimes in life the action required is “not to do anything”. This is very different from don’t do anything in a normal sense. This concept is stressed very heavily in the Daoist philosophy because the Daoists perceive a reality that has both action and non action together.
This is not a Chinese concept alone. For example, in English we say “No news is good news”. We also say that if the opponent does not say no, that can be construed as acquiescence.
Daoists believe that Wuwei should be at least half of our actions. This is a very difficult task to achieve.

… Next is rotation and spirals. In any of the stances of the circles the weight on the feet is mostly caused by the torso and if your torso moves the weight will change. Therefore if your torso is truly rotating then the centre is not moving and you don’t shift so the weight should remain the same. And if your weight never changes and you are pushing hands, the opponent’s moves must be having no effect.

Also a rotation keeps the centre intact and a true centre is just a straight line but rotation is not enough you need another direction and that movement is downward. This creates a spiral. All the spiral does is move everything in such a way so that the straight line in the centre moves and remains a straight line.

Using the torso as an example. If your torso were to be rotating and moving downward or spiraling then any force that hits it will only be moving with it. This is because when a force comes in contact with a rotation the rotation is always moving 90 degrees to that force and in physics I learned that every force is made up of component forces. These components are just forces in different directions that when you add them up they are really only in one direction.

However there is no 90 degree component in any force. And the downward movement we do is also 90 degrees so if you move down as much as you rotate then the result is you are moving at a 45 degree angle with depth to the push. And there is so much talk about 45 degrees in Practical Method taiji. So if all body parts moved this way then they would all actually moving in straight lines.

We constantly work with two aspects of movement: power and structure. On the body the power must be on the outer limbs: Head, finger and feet. In relation to the opponent, the power (physically the outer limbs listed above) must always stay on (point at) the opponent’s center line. Read more